The map below is your guide to a walking tour of

CLINTON, LOUISIANA
(Simply click on the numbers and information about the attraction will be displayed)
Fuqua House





#1 The Jewish Cemetery
The final resting place for many of the town's German-Jewish settlers who
contributed so much to commercial and cultural life in Clinton during the
late 19th. and early 20th. Centuries.


#2 George Hays House (c.1890)
Built by a successful town merchant.


 

#3 Isadore Mayer-Hobgood House (c.1900)
Another fine example of a home built by a successful business owner.


 

#4 E.M., Toler House and the
Rist Hotel (c.1931)
These structures were built to
replace three 1860 buildings which
burned in the Christmas Eve
fire of 1930.



photo: Marcia Westerfield

#33 Rogers House also known as The President's House.
Original one-room landgrant claim habitation constructed
to fullfill Spanish land claim for Richard Inman ca. 1810.
Later enlarged by Joseph Felps in the late 1820s to early
1830s. Victorian embellishments added by Dr. Lewis,
president of Silliman Institute in the late 1890s. Former
residence of John C. Rogers, principal of Clinton High
School from 1932 to 1958, and founder of an independent
anti-Long newspaper in the 1930s. The home is now owned
and occupied by his grandson John H. Rogers, and is a
private residence.

 

#5 Martin Hill (c.1890)
Built by an early Clinton lawyer and later enlarged to house the
family of H.L. Mayer who had a store on the Square.


#6 Lockwood-Freeland House (c.1872)

#6A Fuqua House (ca.1870)
located on Plank Road in Clinton LA. This restored private residence is constructed of heart pine and cypress.

 

 


 

 


#7 The Little House (c.1870)


#8 Boatner-Record House (c.1830)
One of the earliest homes remaining in this area.


#9 Brame-Bennett House (c.1840)
This home is included in the Historic American Buildings
Survey and is listed on the National Register.

#10 Durham Cottage (c.1838)

#11 Wedgewood (c.1825)

#12 Skipwith House (c.1850)
Another early home of the area.

#13 Stonehedge (c.1837)
Was built by Lafayette Saunders, designer of the historic Courthouse.
For many years, it was the home of the Stone Family.

#14 Powers-Wheat House (c.1845)
Built by a German seaman named Bilger who settled in Clinton.

#15 Silliman Institute (c.1840, 1860, 1894))
The Institute was established in 1852, by wealthy William
Silliman, to educate young ladies.
.

Also just south of Sillman Institute on Bank Street:

Rogers House also known as The President's House.
Original one-room landgrant claim habitation constructed to fullfill Spanish land claim for Richard Inman ca. 1810. Later enlarged by Joseph Felps in the late 1820s to early 1830s. Victorian embellishments added by Dr. Lewis, president of Silliman Institute in the late 1890s. Former residence of John C. Rogers, principal of Clinton High School from 1932 to 1958, and founder of an independent anti-Long newspaper in the 1930s. The home is now owned and occupied by his grandson John H. Rogers, and is a private residence.



#16 Forrester House (c.1900)


#17 Kilbourne House (c.1903)

#18 Durham-Ball House (c.1840)

#19 Carroll House (c.1910)

#20 The Levy-Hatcher House (c.1903)-

#21 Clinton Confederate Cemetery
This historic cemetery is where many prominent Clintonians are buried including Susan Bostwick and James Holmes who were developers of the town. Also buried here is John Rhea who was a founder of the Clinton and Port Hudson Railroad and president of the West Florida Convention which established an independent nation in the Florida Parishes in 1810. A walk through this cemetery is a walk through the history of Clinton, war, yellow fever epidemics, the Civil War and early hard times. The unmarked graves of Civil War soldiers are on the Western edge of the burial ground.

#22 Marston House (c.1837)
This building is the Bank for which Bank Street is named.
The building got its name from Henry Marston who was the
cashier and later the owner and president. He and his
family lived in the building.

#23 Wildflower (c.1908)

#24 Clinton First Baptist Church (c.1872)

#25 St. Andrew's Episcopal Church (c.1871)

#26 Hope Terrace (c.1840)
Also built by John Rhea, this building became a school for girls.

#27 Wall House (c.1839 with additions in 1895)
This was the home of noted Methodists Isaac and Mary Winans Wall.

#28 Woodside (c.1847)
This was the home of the comptroller of the (vanished) Clinton Military Academy
which stood across St. Helena St.

#29 Corcoran-DeLee Building (c.1836)
This structure survived the many fires which plagued Clinton since
its founding. It does, however, bear many of the scars.

#30 East Feliciana Parish Courthouse (c.1840)
Built to replace one of the earliest structures which had burned.
This is the oldest and finest operating courthouse in Louisiana.

#31 Lawyers Row (c.1840-1860)
This National Landmark once housed the "flower of the
Louisiana Bar" who argued the cases that made Clinton
a legal center of the 1800's.

#32 Brick Yard (c.1903)
Once part of a complex built to house businesses, this lone surviving
structure is now a private residence.



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